This article has been saved to your library here.

You have reached the maximum of 5 saved articles. Want to review and email them?

Lifestage mascot

How old is your dog?

Pre-Puppy
Pre-Puppy preview image

Pre-Puppy

What’s better than puppies? That’s right: your own puppy. So, what do you need to know before you take the plunge into pet parenthood?

0-2 months
0-2 months preview image

0-2 months

Welcome to the world little one. It’s all grow-grow-grow for your puppy right now, so there’s many things to prepare.

2-3 months
2-3 months preview image

2-3 months

Your puppy is ready to come home and turn your world upside down. It’s time to put your preparation into practice – and remember to take it all in!

3-6 months
3-6 months preview image

3-6 months

You’re entering a period of immense growth, lots of learning and new adventures. Bring on the play date with the big wide world!

6-12 months
6-12 months preview image

6-12 months

Your fur-baby is nearing adulthood. Can you see their grown self coming through? Sigh…they grow up so fast, don’t they?

12-18 months
12-18 months preview image

12-18 months

Your puppy has turned one and they might not be so little anymore. Make sure to book their first annual check-up.

18 months - 3 years
18 months - 3 years preview image

18 months - 3 years

Your dog is one an established family member now. Enjoy who they have become and the bond you now share at this special stage.

3 - 8 years
3 - 8 years preview image

3 - 8 years

Your dog is a full-grown adult now. They understand where their place is in your home and the wider world.

8+ years
8+ years preview image

8+ years

Just like many senior citizens, senior dogs have some extra needs. Learn to look after your best friend and support their health as they grow older.

Caring for an Anxious Dog

Caring for an Anxious Dog

Anxiety is one of the most common issues affecting pet dogs. Puppies and adult dogs can experience mild anxiety from time to time. However, some dogs may develop chronic anxiety in response to specific situations such as separation, unfamiliar people, unfamiliar animals, vet visits, a change in routine and even inanimate objects like the vacuum cleaner or lawn mower.

Signs you Have an Anxious Dog

Signs of anxiety in dogs can vary from quite subtle to very obvious and include:

panting, pacing, sweaty paws, dilated pupils, not eating, excessive vocalisation, excessive salivation, destructive scratching or chewing, house soiling, excessive licking & attempting to escape the home or property.

If you notice persistent signs of anxiety in your dog there are things you can do to help them.

Tips for Helping your Dog with their Anxiety

Helping anxious dogs involves changing their emotional response to the thing or situation that causes the anxiety by changing their negative association with the trigger to a positive one. This can be achieved using a combination of gradual desensitisation and counter-conditioning.

Eg, for a dog experiencing separation anxiety you start by exposing them to very short separations that are well tolerated and pairing the separations with things your dog values (e.g. a meal, long lasting treat, favourite toys etc).

Over time, the duration of the separation is gradually increased if the dog is coping well.

Gradual desensitisation and counter-conditioning can be used to help address your dog’s anxiety in response to any trigger.

It’s important when working with an anxious dog that you try to minimise their anxiety by keeping your distance from the trigger or environment that causes the anxiety to start with.

Pairing your dog’s favourite dog treats with the anxiety-provoking thing is a great way to help change the way they feel about it over time. As your dog becomes more comfortable with the trigger you can slowly move closer over time as the sessions progress.

Calming aids, such as nutraceuticals, anxiety wraps and pheromones can help to ease mild anxiety in dogs. Anti-anxiety medications are also available and these can be very beneficial in conjunction with behaviour modification. Speak with your vet to find out if medication is a good option for your anxious dog.

Having an anxious dog can be stressful for pet owners and their pets and professional help is available from suitably qualified dog trainers and behaviourists if you’re unsure or your dog’s anxiety is not improving.

Articles

Save your favourite articles

Want to save this article and others for later? Easy!

  1. Click the toggle  at the top of each article you’d like to save.
  2. View your saved articles in My Library in top nav in the top right of the page.
  3. Open your saved articles and enter your details and we’ll send them to you.

Pet Paw-Trol

Promotion preview

Win a Dog Treats Gift Pack

Don't miss your chance to WIN a dog treats gift pack.

Enter Now

Promotion preview

Promotions to your Inbox

Stay up to date with more info, tips and support you need to build a strong, lasting relationship with your best friend .

Sign up Now